Public Art: The Royal Alexandra Children's Hospital Artworks

Buoys

Art was an important part of the development of the new Royal Alexandra Children’s Hospital and Kajima and the Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals Trust help ensure it was built into the environment. Everyone involved recognised that artists and their work had a unique opportunity to make a creative contribution to a major hospital building scheme.

Boy and Girl

Two key external commissions are 'Buoys' and 'Boy and Girl'. 'Buoys' created by Ally Wallace are a series of brightly coloured aluminium columns that look like huge toy blocks, they are placed randomly outside of the new building, as if they are bobbing about on the sea. 'Boy and Girl' by Jon Mills is a painted steel sculpture. The boy and girl stand together, holding hands, as friends or brother and sister, welcoming everyone into the children's hospital. The latest addition to the outside artworks is 'Crumpleslide' by Walter Jack, installed in 2009 it is made of a foam core with a smooth fibreglass finish, it is a bumpy slide that is the shape of a crumpled up piece of paper.

Inside the hospital are more commissions, accessible if you are a patient or visitor or by special permission. 'Caustic Network' designed by Jason Bruges is an interactive light projection that enhances the main entrance wall. Bruges recreated the ripple patterns he saw on the side of boats in Brighton Marina. The projectors are linked to hidden sensors which respond to movement, so as people pass them, the ripples dance up the wall at different speeds, depending how you move. 'Life Begins' is a stainless steel, highly polished, original sculpture by George Cutts.  Situated on the first floor outside the children's assessment area it is intended for interaction and play.  

OasisWalter Bailey’s burned and carved oak sculptures are situated in the calm, peaceful oasis room. Bailey uses a chainsaw to transform the tree trunks in to beautiful, delicate sculptures. The calved curves allow the light to pass through and the circular patterns give the sculptures a relaxing feel. All the art pieces work together to create a positive atmosphere for children, parents and staff.


See the next artwork: Fingermaze