Brighton, Hove & Portslade cemeteries

The council's burial grounds

Extra-Mural Cemetery

The council own and manage seven cemeteries (almost 170 acres) to the highest standard possible and in accordance with the requirements of statutory law, bylaws and customs, including religious and ethnic considerations. Kindly note that no dogs are allowed in the cemeteries and children must be accompanied by an adult. This page gives information on the traditional cemeteries in Brighton & Hove - you may also wish to know more about the council's natural burial grounds.

The cemeteries are open 365 days a year. Monday to Saturday from 9am, Sunday and public holidays from 11am. Gates are closed at 4pm between October and March and 5.30pm between April and September.

If you need to visit the council's cemeteries take a look at our cemetery location map (PDF 150kb). There is not an individual office at each cemetery. Enquiries should be directed to the Bereavement Services staff based at the Woodvale Lodge Office at Woodvale Crematorium.  

Extra Mural Cemetery, Lewes Road, Brighton

Opened 1851 (16.5 acres). No new graves available.

Part of this Victorian burial ground, containing many fine memorials, has been converted into a garden of remembrance, a children's memorial garden and a tomb and nature trail, incorporating a picnic area. A chapel (Grade II listed) is available for funerals. A sectional plan of the Extra Mural Cemetery is available to view (PDF 1.16mb). For visitors using a satellite navigation system in their vehicle, the post code for the cemetery is BN2 3QB. 

Woodvale Cemetery, Lewes Road, Brighton

Borough Cemetery (Woodvale)

Opened in 1857 (20.5 acres). Previously known as Lewes Road Cemetery. No new graves are available.

The Woodvale Crematorium and chapels are located in this cemetery. The area around the chapels has been landscaped with lawns, waterfall and stream, flower beds and rockeries to provide the correct environment for funerals.

The burial ground is Grade II listed and until 1902 was known as the Brighton 'Parochial' cemetery. A sectional plan of the Lewes Road (Woodvale) Cemetery is available to view (PDF 1.16mb). For visitors using a satellite navigation system in their vehicle, the post code for the cemetery is BN2 3QB.

City Cemetery, Bear Road, Brighton

Borough Cemetery - Bear Road

Opened in 1868 (31.5 acres). No new adult graves available but existing graves can be re-opened if there is sufficient depth remaining.

This burial ground includes Commonwealth War Graves, the St Dunstans plot, Angel's Corner for the interment of children, a meadow area to encourage wildlife and a Baha'i section. There is no cemetery chapel. A sectional plan of the City Cemetery is available to view (PDF 1.28mb). For visitors using a satellite navigation system in their vehicle, the post code for the cemetery is BN2 4DA.

Portslade Cemetery, Victoria Road, Portslade

Portslade Cemetery

Opened in 1872 (7 acres). No new graves available but existing graves can be re-opened if there is sufficient depth remaining.

There are two small Victorian chapels but only one is available for funerals. Although the main entrance to Portslade Cemetery is located in Victoria Road, there is an alternative pedestrian entrance in Trafalgar Road. A sectional plan of Portslade Cemetery is available to view (PDF 888kb). For visitors using a satellite navigation system in their vehicle, the post code for the cemetery is BN41 1XB.

Hove Cemetery, Old Shoreham Road, Hove

Hove Cemetery

Opened in 1882 (50 acres) Traditional, lawn, children's and cremated remains plots available.

This is a large burial ground spanning both sides of the A270 trunk road. There is a Victorian chapel, in the southern half of the cemetery, available for funeral services to be held.  Public toilets are provided in Hove Cemetery (North) and an accessable toilet in Hove Cemetery (South).Sections have been set aside to accommodate all faiths including Muslim, Baha'i, non orthodox Jewish (with its own Prayer Hall) and Coptic Christians.A sectional plan of Hove Cemetery is available to view (PDF 879kb).For visitors using a satellite navigation system in their vehicle, the post code for the cemetery is BN3 7EF.

Lawn Memorial Cemetery, Warren Road, Woodingdean, Brighton

Lawn Memorial CemeteryOpened in 1963. (36.5 acres). Lawn style graves available - only tablets laid flat at ground level are allowed.

This burial ground includes areas set aside for Muslims (with a dedicated washroom), Quakers and other denominations. There is no cemetery chapel (the chapels at Woodvale, approximately one mile away, are available for use). An accessible toilet is provided for visitors. A sectional plan of the Lawn Memorial Cemetery is available to view (PDF 738kb). For visitors using a satellite navigation system in their vehicle, the post code for the cemetery is BN2 6DX.

Jewish Cemetery, Meadow View, Brighton

Jewish Cemetery ExtensionOpened in 1919 and extended in 1978. Orthodox Jewish graves available.

Enquiries about the this cemetery should be directed to Brighton & Hove Hebrew Congregation as the Rights of Burial to all graves in this cemetery were granted to them when the burial ground became operative and they hold records of burials. For visitors using a satellite navigation system in their vehicle, the post code for the cemetery is BN2 4DE.

Transferring grave ownership

Often it is necessary to transfer the ownership of a grave, from a living or deceased owner, to someone else before it can be used again or a memorial arranged. The process varies depending on the respective circumstances and a fee applies for transferring the ownership. To find out more on what has to be done, it is advisable to read our information on transferring grave ownership.

Overhanging Trees - Common Law Rights

If you are concerned about trees overhanging your boundary from an adjoining cemetery, you are able to exercise your 'Common (unwritten) Law' right to maintain your boundary. Under Common Law you are entitled to prune back the branches that grow over your boundary from the neighbouring cemetery, only to the boundary line but not beyond.

You are required to offer these branches to the council, which is not required to accept them. If this is the case, it is your responsibility to dispose of the pruned branches responsibly - you are not entitled to deposit them in the adjoining cemetery without the council's permission.

However, if the overhanging tree is subject to a Tree Preservation Order (TPO) or is within a Conservation Area or a Restrictive Covenant applies, you need the council's written consent before you carried out any work.

If the tree to be pruned back to the boundary line is an Elm tree, contact the council's Arboricultural Service, as the tree could be infected with Dutch Elm Disease and may need specialist pruning.

Regulations, fees and further useful information

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